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Alaskan Malamute Vs. Bearded Collie

Bearded Collie
Bearded Collie Dog, sitting on Grass

Selecting the perfect dog breed for your lifestyle is important. When considering different breeds, two popular choices often come to our minds – the Alaskan Malamute and the Bearded Collie. 

Introduction

Alaskan Malamute
Cheerful malamute playfully lies on a white background. Via Depositphotos.

Both these breeds have unique physical and behavioral traits that set them apart. The purpose of this article is to explore the distinct differences between the Alaskan Malamute and the Bearded Collie, assisting you in making an informed choice about which breed would be the best fit for you.

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Comparison Table

AspectAlaskan MalamuteBearded Collie
SizeLargeMedium
Weight75-100 pounds45-55 pounds
Height23-25 inches20-22 inches
Coat TypeThick, double-layeredShaggy, profuse
Coat ColorsVarious (gray, black, white)Various (black, gray, brown)
Grooming RequirementsHighModerate
Exercise NeedsHighModerate
TrainabilityChallengingEasier
TemperamentIndependent, strong-willedFriendly, outgoing
Compatibility with PetsMay have a high prey driveGood with other pets
Ideal ForExperienced owners, cold climatesFamilies, various activities

Physical Appearance Of The Alaskan Malamute 

Alaskan Malamute

Via Depositphotos.

The Alaskan Malamute, a breed known for its size and strength, was originally developed to endure the demanding tasks of hauling heavy loads in the unforgiving Arctic environment. These magnificent dogs boast thick and plush coats in various colors, such as gray, black, and white.

Their fur is double-layered, with a dense undercoat that provides insulation and a long, coarse outer coat that helps repel water and snow. Moreover, the Alaskan Malamutes have broad heads, almond-shaped eyes, and erect ears set high on their heads. 

With a strong physique characterized by a deep chest, sturdy bone structure, and strong shoulders, the Alaskan Malamute displays impressive muscularity. Typically weighing between 75 and 100 pounds and standing at a height of 23 to 25 inches at the shoulder, these dogs exude great strength and power.

Check out: Irish Setter vs. Pomeranian.

Physical Appearance Of The Bearded Collie

Bearded Collie
Bearded Collie Dog, sitting on Grass. Via Depositphotos.

The Bearded Collie is a medium-sized breed originally bred for herding sheep in Scotland. These dogs have a shaggy, profuse coat in various colors, including black, gray, and brown. Their fur is double-layered, with a soft undercoat and a long, wavy outer coat that requires regular grooming to prevent matting. 

They have long, narrow heads, round eyes, and long, floppy ears covered in fur. Moreover, they have a lean build with a deep chest, sloping shoulders, and a delicate bone structure. These dogs typically weigh between 45 and 55 pounds and stand 20 to 22 inches tall at the shoulder.

Check out: Havanese vs Pomeranian.

Comparison Of The Two Breeds’ Physical Traits

Regarding physical appearance, the Alaskan Malamute and Bearded Collie are quite different. While both breeds have thick, double-layered coats, the texture and length of their fur differ significantly. 

Alaskan Malamutes have a much larger and more muscular build than Bearded Collies, and their heads are broader and more defined. They have a more erect posture, while Bearded Collies have a more sloping, graceful appearance.

In terms of size, Alaskan Malamutes are significantly larger and heavier than Bearded Collies. This makes them better suited for hauling heavy loads or working in cold climates, while Bearded Collies are better suited for herding or agility work. 

Additionally, Alaskan Malamutes are generally more independent and strong-willed, while Bearded Collies are more eager to please and are highly trainable.

Both breeds have distinct physical traits that make them unique and well-suited for different purposes. When choosing between the two, it’s important to consider your lifestyle and the activities you plan to engage in with your dog.

Alaskan Malamute’s Behavioral Traits

Alaskan Malamute

Via Depositphotos.

The Alaskan Malamute is an intelligent, independent, and hard-working breed that often exhibits a dominant and strong-willed nature. This breed is known for being loyal to its owner but can be stubborn and difficult to train if not handled properly. 

In addition, they are highly active dogs that require lots of daily exercises and mental stimulation to stay healthy and happy. Due to their high prey drive, Alaskan Malamutes can be difficult to keep in households with smaller pets, such as cats or rabbits.

Learn more about the Alaskan Malamute Temperament & Personality.

Bearded Collie’s Behavioral Traits

Bearded Collie
Two amazing bearded collies running together in summer. Via Depositphotos.

The Bearded Collie, also known as the “Beardie,” is intelligent, playful, affectionate, and known for its herding instinct. These dogs are friendly, outgoing, and very good with children and other pets. 

Moreover, they are extremely loyal to their owners and are known for being highly trainable. However, they can become bored quickly, so they require plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to prevent destructive behavior.

Check out: Anaconda vs. Asian Vine snake.

Comparison Of The Two Breeds’ Behavioral Traits

The Alaskan Malamute and the Bearded Collie have distinct behavioral traits that make them unique. The Alaskan Malamute is more independent and dominant, making it a challenging breed for novice pet owners. 

On the other hand, the Bearded Collie is more friendly and outgoing, making it an excellent choice for families with children or other pets. Both breeds require plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to stay healthy and happy. 

Still, the Alaskan Malamute may be better suited for active individuals who are experienced with handling large, independent dogs. 

In contrast, the Bearded Collie is a great choice for families who want a playful, affectionate breed that is easy to train. Ultimately, the decision between these two breeds will depend on your lifestyle, experience, and personal preferences.

Alaskan Malamute’s Exercise Needs

Alaskan Malamute

Via Depositphotos.

If you’re an active person looking for a furry workout buddy, the Alaskan Malamute might be the right dog for you. These beautiful, strong-willed creatures were originally bred to pull sleds across rough terrain for miles. 

As a result, they have some of the highest exercise requirements of any breed out there. On average, Alaskan Malamutes need at least 2 hours of daily exercise, including one long walk or run. 

They thrive on activities challenging their minds and bodies, like hiking, backpacking, and agility courses. Alaskan Malamutes can become destructive and unhappy without enough exercise or mental stimulation.

Bearded Collie’s Exercise Needs

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The Bearded Collie is an active dog that is slightly easier to manage. While they still need plenty of exercise, Bearded Collies don’t require quite the same intensity as Alaskan Malamutes. 

They were originally bred to herd sheep, which means they have an instinct to work and move around. Bearded Collies should exercise at least 1 hour daily, including a moderate walk or run. They’re also great candidates for dog sports like agility and flyball. Unlike Alaskan Malamutes, Bearded Collies don’t need to be “worked” quite as hard to stay happy and healthy.

Comparison Of The Two Breeds’ Exercise Requirements

Regarding exercise, it’s clear that Alaskan Malamutes and Bearded Collies have different needs. While both breeds require daily activity, the Alaskan Malamute needs more to stay healthy and happy. This is something to consider if you have a busy lifestyle. Or even if you can’t dedicate multiple hours to exercising your dog each day. 

However, the Alaskan Malamute might be the perfect match if you love being active and want a pup that can keep you up. Bearded Collies require less exercise overall but have a natural drive to work and move around. 

This makes them great companions for people who enjoy outdoor activities but don’t want a much-demanding breed. Therefore, whatever breed you choose, make sure you have the time and energy to meet their exercise requirements so they can be their best selves.

Key Points

The Alaskan Malamute, a breed known for its size and strength, was originally developed to endure the demanding tasks of hauling heavy loads in the unforgiving Arctic environment. 
The Bearded Collie is a medium-sized breed originally bred for herding sheep in Scotland. These dogs have a shaggy, profuse coat in various colors, including black, gray, and brown.
The Alaskan Malamute is more independent and dominant, making it a challenging breed for novice pet owners. On the other hand, the Bearded Collie is more friendly and outgoing, making it an excellent choice for families with children or other pets. 
Bearded Collies should exercise at least 1 hour daily, including a moderate walk or run. They’re also great candidates for dog sports like agility and flyball. Unlike Alaskan Malamutes, Bearded Collies don’t need to be “worked” quite as hard to stay happy and healthy.
The Alaskan Malamute is a loyal and hardworking breed that thrives in colder climates and can excel in activities like sledding. 

Wrap Up

YouTube video

To wrap it up, the Alaskan Malamute and the Bearded Collie have their own strengths and weaknesses. The Alaskan Malamute is a loyal and hardworking breed that thrives in colder climates and can excel in activities like sledding. 

In contrast, the Bearded Collie is a friendly and energetic breed that is great for families and loves participating in various activities. In the end, it’s always desirable to consider your lifestyle and preferences before choosing which breed to pet.

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