Skip to Content

How Do You Know If There Are Crocs In The Water In Florida?

Brillenkaiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare), Portrait, frontal, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brasilien via DepostiPhotos
Brillenkaiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare), Portrait, frontal, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brasilien via Depostiphotos

In Florida, spotting crocodiles can be a bit like playing a game of “Where’s Waldo?” but with a lot more adrenaline. Look for signs like ripples in the water, floating logs that suddenly move, or those eerie eyes just peeking above the surface. Also, avoid the urge to take a dip if the local alligator is using a floaty—chances are, his croc cousins are nearby too!

There Are Always Sharks in the Water If There’s Water

saltwater crocodile
Saltwater Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus). This is Maximo, a 15’+ crocodile at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm. Obtained from Molly Ebersold of the St. Augustine Alligator Farm, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Despite what your unreasonable uncle might tell you, not all water bodies in Florida are infested with sharks. However, it’s always good to be cautious. Remember, if it’s freshwater, it’s not sharks you need to worry about—it’s the crocodiles lurking silently. And if it’s a lake, well, you might be safe from sharks, but keep an eye out for any “log” that looks a bit too lifelike.

Enjoy Florida’s Waters Safely

Gustave the Nile crocodile. Image by Facts Machine via YouTube

So, whether you’re scanning for sneaky crocs or watching out for mythical lake sharks, always keep your wits about you. A little humor goes a long way, but safety should always come first. When in doubt, just stick to the pool!

Let’s explore the physical characteristics of the crocodile to further understand them…

Skin

saltwater crocodile
Saltwater crocodile. Image via Depositphotos

Crocodiles have rough, scaly skin that acts as armor.

Eyes

crocodile
Image via Depositphotos

Their eyes are positioned on top of their heads.

Teeth

crocodile
Image via Depositphotos

Crocodiles boast sharp, conical teeth designed for tearing prey.

Jaws

crocodile
Image via Depositphotos

With one of the strongest bite forces, their jaws are built for crushing!

Tail

crocodile
Saltwater crocodile as it emerges from water with a toothy grin. Image via Depositphotos

A crocodile’s muscular tail is used for propulsion in water.

Legs

An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth via DepostiPhotos
An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth via Depositphotos

Crocodiles have short but strong legs. They are adapted for both swimming and walking on land.

Nostrils

An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth via DepostiPhotos
An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth via DepositPhotos

Located on top of their snouts, their nostrils let them breathe while mostly submerged.

Ears

An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth via DepostiPhotos
An large alligator look up the see if there are any food ready, with the sharp teeth. Image via Depostiphotos

Crocodiles have small, slit-like ears that close when they dive.

Scutes

Majestic Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). Chamo lake, Arba Minch Ethiopia, Africa. Image via Depositphotos

Bony plates called scutes cover their back. This gives them additional protection.

Belly

Brillenkaiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare), Portrait, frontal, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brasilien via DepostiPhotos
Brillenkaiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare), Portrait, frontal, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brasilien via Depostiphotos

The belly is softer and less armored than the back. This makes it a vulnerable spot.

Size

crocodile
Saltwater crocodile. Image via Depositphotos

Crocodiles can grow to impressive lengths. Some species reach over 20 feet.

Coloration

crocodile
Crocodile roaming in the water. Image via Depositphotos

Their coloration ranges from olive green to brown.

Snout

crocodile
Saltwater crocodile underwater shot. Image via Depositphotos

Crocodiles have long, pointed snouts. They also vary in shape and size depending on the species.

Webbed Feet

crocodile
Crocodile. Image via Depositphotos

Their webbed feet help with swimming and give them stability on muddy banks.

Claws

saltwater crocodile
Saltwater crocodile. Image via Depositphotos

Sharp claws on their feet help them dig and capture prey.

Lifespan

Young alligator. I
African dwarf crocodile baby, its scientific name is Osteolaemus tetraspis. mage via Depositphotos.

Crocodiles can live for several decades. Some of them even reach up to 70 years old!

Bottom Line

crocodile
Saltwater crocodile hiding under water line. Image via Depositphotos

Find the link to the full video here!

Overall, if you’re cautiously checking for crocodiles in Florida’s waters, it’s clear that these reptiles demand respect. Additonally, by understanding their physical features, you fully appreciate these ancient creatures and also make sure of your safety in their natural habitat!

If you enjoyed this article, check out our related article below!

Next up:

Join our Forum for free today!

Animal Forum
Click Here
Grizzly Bear Spotted Feet From Alaskan Campsite Top 10 States With The Most Cougar Top 10 States With The Most Moose Top 10 States With The Most Coyote Top 10 States With The Most Elk