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California Man Rescues Venomous Snakes As A Hobby

Screenshot from: "Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby," Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

In California, where the sun beats down relentlessly there’s a man on a mission. His name is Bruce and his hobby is very important. He’s a wrangler of sorts, rescuing tons of venomous snakes. It’s not your typical pastime, but for him and his team of volunteers, it’s a calling.

The 4-pm Grind

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

His days are busy with the usual grind of work, but come 4 o’clock, it’s time to put on those boots and head out to wrangle some snakes. He jokes with his wife that it’s his midlife crisis, though instead of a sports car, he’s chosen adrenaline-fueled rescues as his outlet.

Labor Day Haul

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

Labor Day weekend was a particularly bustling time for him. He recalls the eight Southern Pacific rattlesnakes he relocated from various homes in the area. To him, these snakes aren’t just creatures to be feared; they’re Nature’s underdogs, misunderstood and misrepresented.

Higher Stakes

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

It’s not all adrenaline rushes and rescues, though. Some calls are more challenging than others, especially when the snakes are caught in garden netting. The stakes are higher knowing that any wrong move could spell disaster for both him and the snake.

Survival Radius

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

But it’s not just about the rescue; it’s also about the release. Snakes have their territory, and if they’re taken too far from it, their survival rate drops significantly. So, he carefully transports them back to prime habitat, ensuring they have the best chance at thriving.

Good Work

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

Ultimately, it’s about honoring the natural equilibrium of the environment, not just about saving snakes. The ecosystem would quickly get out of control without these animals. With the knowledge that he is changing things in a modest way, he continues on his mission, eliminating one snake at a time. You can watch the video clip here.

Some Common Snakes in California

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

Many species of snakes live in and around the state of California. Here are the top 5:

Northern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus oreganus)

Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
Northern Pacific Rattlesnake. Image via Depositphotos

Found primarily in northern California, the Northern Pacific Rattlesnake is a subspecies of the Western Rattlesnake. It thrives in a variety of habitats, including forests and grasslands, and is recognized by its distinct rattling sound.

Southern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus helleri)

The Southern Pacific Rattlesnake
Southern Pacific Rattlesnake. Image via Depositphotos

The Southern Pacific Rattlesnake inhabits southern California, particularly in coastal and inland valleys. It is a highly adaptable species, often encountered in urban and suburban areas, making it one of the most common rattlesnakes in the region.

Mojave Rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus)

mojave rattlesnake
Mojave rattlesnake. Photo by Mark Bratton, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The Mojave Rattlesnake, known for its potent neurotoxic venom, resides in the desert regions of southeastern California. It is distinguished by its greenish coloration and aggressive behavior, making it one of the most dangerous rattlesnakes in North America.

Sidewinder (Crotalus cerastes)

Sidewinder
Sidewinder. Philip Kahn, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The Sidewinder, known for its unique sideways movement, inhabits the deserts of southeastern California. It is small and well-camouflaged, making it difficult to spot. This rattlesnake’s venom is relatively less potent, but it can still pose a danger to humans and animals.

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake coiled to strike. Image via Depositphotos

The Western Diamondback Rattlesnake is found in the eastern deserts of California. Recognizable by its diamond-shaped patterns, this species is large and robust, often encountered in arid and semi-arid environments, posing a significant threat due to its size and venom.

Conclusion

Screenshot from: “Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

Thank you for following along! You can watch the video clip here.

YouTube video
“Man Saves Tons Of Venomous Snakes As A Hobby,” Source: YouTube, Uploaded: The Dodo

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