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Top 20 States With The Most Rattlesnake Species

Western Diamond snake
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake. Image via Holger Krisp, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Can you guess which states have the most rattlesnake species? Rattlesnakes thrive across the United States. Each state offers a unique mix of these venomous reptiles. Here are the top 20 states with the most rattlesnake species.

20. Arkansas

Firstly Arkansas has two rattlesnake species: the Timber rattlesnake and the Western diamondback.  Moreover these snakes live in the grasslands and forests of the state. Thus adding to the diversity and balance of the local ecology.

Rattle snake
A rattlesnake in Death Valley, California. Image via Tigerhawkvok (talk · contribs), CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

19. Oregon

Rattle snake
The rattle of the snake is found at the tip of the rattle snakes tail. Image via ALAN SCHMIERER, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Secondly Oregon is home to three rattlesnake species: the Great Basin, Northern Pacific, and Prairie/Western. Generally these snakes are found in the diverse habitats – from deserts to forested regions.

18. Oklahoma

western diamondback rattlesnake
Western diamondback rattlesnake. Image via Depositphotos

Thirdly Oklahoma hosts three rattlesnake species: the Prairie/Western, Western massasauga, and Western pygmy. These species are spread across the state’s plains, contributing to the natural biodiversity.

17. North Carolina

western diamondback rattlesnake
Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox. Western Diamondback. Dangerous snake. Image via Depositphotos

Fourthly North Carolina features three rattlesnake species: the Eastern diamondback, Pygmy, and Timber. Among these the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) is the largest rattlesnake species.

16. Nebraska

Pygmy Rattlesnake
Pygmy Rattlesnake.
Image via Depositphotos

Nebraska has three rattlesnake species: the Prairie/Western, Timber, and Western massasauga. Moreover Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) can grow up to 5 feet (1.5 meters) in length, with most individuals ranging between 3 and 4.5 feet (0.9 to 1.4 meters).

15. Missouri

Pigmy Rattlesnake
Pigmy Rattlesnake. Image via Deposit Photos

Missouri is home to three rattlesnake species: the Eastern massasauga, Timber, and Western pygmy. These species are found in wetlands, forests and rocky areas. Thus enhancing the state’s natural diversity.

14. Mississippi

Prairie Rattlesnake. Patrick Alexander, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons.https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crotalus_viridis_70568583.jpg#/media/File:Crotalus_viridis_70568583.jpg

Mississippi contains three rattlesnake species: the Canebrake, Eastern diamondback, and Pygmy. Eastern diamondbacks can reach lengths of up to 8 feet (2.4 meters), although the average length is typically between 4 and 5.5 feet (1.2 to 1.7 meters).

13. Louisiana

Timber rattlesnake resting on rock
Timber rattlesnake. Image via Deposit Photos

Louisiana includes three rattlesnake species: the Canebrake, Eastern diamondback, and Pygmy. Evidently these species are found in a variety of habitats, including swamps, forests, and grasslands across the state.

12. Iowa

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus)
Baby Timber rattlesnake. Image via Deposit Photos

Iowa boasts three rattlesnake species: the Eastern massasauga, Prairie/Western, and Timber. Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) are robust snakes, often weighing up to 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms).

11. Georgia

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) coiled next to car wheel. Image via Depositphotos

Georgia harbors three rattlesnake species: the Eastern diamondback, Pygmy, and Timber. Generally these snakes are found in diverse habitats, from coastal plains to forested mountains, adding to the state’s wildlife.

10. Florida

Eastern diamondback rattlesnake
Head of an eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus). Image via Depositphotos

Florida is home to three rattlesnake species: the Eastern diamondback, Pygmy, and Timber. Moreover these species thrive in Florida’s varied environments, including swamps, forests and coastal areas.

9. Colorado

rattlesnake rattle
Rattle of a rattlesnake. Laura Camp from San Juan Capistrano, CA, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Colorado has three rattlesnake species: the Faded, Prairie, and Western massasauga. Evidently these snakes are spread across the state’s diverse landscapes, from grasslands to mountainous regions.

8. Alabama

mojave rattlesnake
Mojave rattlesnake. Image via Depositphotos

Alabama features three rattlesnake species: the Eastern diamondback, Pygmy, and Timber. Generally the Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius) grows to lengths of 1 to 2 feet (0.3 to 0.6 meters), with a maximum length of about 2.5 feet (0.76 meters).

7. Kansas

sidewinder rattlesnake
Sidewinder – Crotalus cerastes, inconic venomous rattlesnake from desert regions of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Image via Depositphotos

Evidently Kansas is home to four rattlesnake species: the Prairie/Western, Pygmy, Timber, and Western diamondback. These species thrive in the state’s grasslands, prairies and forests, enhancing the ecological variety.

6. Nevada

Pygmy Rattlesnake
Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake – Sisturus miliarius barbouri – side view of head with tongue out, showing yellow tail with rattle. Image via Deposit Photos

Correspondingly Nevada boasts five rattlesnake species: the Great Basin, Mojave Desert, Sidewinder, Speckled southwestern and Western diamondback. These snakes are found in the state’s deserts and mountainous areas, playing a role in the ecosystem.

5. Utah

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) close up with rattle
Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) close up with rattle. Image via Deposit Photos

Undoubtedly Utah has six rattlesnake species: the Great Basin, Hopi rattlesnake, Faded, Mojave Desert, Mojave Desert sidewinder, and Speckled southwestern. These snakes thrive in Utah’s diverse habitats, from deserts to forests.

4. New Mexico

Timber rattlesnake resting on rock in Bannerghatta National Park
Timber rattlesnake resting on rock in Bannerghatta National Park Bangalore, India. Image via Deposit Photos

Generally New Mexico features seven rattlesnake species: the Animas ridge-nosed, Banded rock, Mojave Desert, Mottled rock, Northern black-tailed, Prairie/Western, and Western diamondback. These snakes inhabit the state’s varied landscapes, from deserts to mountains.

3. Texas

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) coiled next to car wheel.
Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) coiled close up. Image via Deposit Photos

Evidently Texas is home to nine rattlesnake species: the Banded rock, Blacktail, Desert massasauga, Mojave Desert, Mottled rock, Prairie/Western, Timber, Western diamondback, and Western massasauga. These species thrive in Texas’s vast and diverse habitats.

2. California

rattlesnake
Rattlesnake. Image via Pixabay.

Correspondingly California boasts twelve rattlesnake species: the Colorado desert sidewinder, Great Basin, Mojave Desert, Mohave green, Northern mojave, Northern pacific, Panamint, Red diamond, Sidewinder, Southwestern speckled, Southern pacific, and Western diamondback. These snakes are spread across the state’s varied ecosystems.

1. Arizona

Great Basin Rattlesnake
Comparatively the Great Basin Rattlesnake.

Image by De’Andre Bush via Unsplash

Lastly on our list Arizona leads with fourteen rattlesnake species: the Arizona black, Arizona ridge-nosed, Banded rock, Desert massasauga, Mojave desert, Sidewinder, Grand Canyon, Great Basin, Northern black-tailed, Prairie/Western, Southwestern speckled, Tiger, Twin-spotted and Western diamondback. These snakes are found in Arizona’s deserts, mountains, and canyons, showcasing the state’s rich biodiversity.

These stats come from World Population Review.

Wrapping Up with the Top 20 States With The Most Rattlesnake Species

Certainly the red rattlesnake (crotalus ruber) also known as red diamondback. Image via Depositphotos

Lastly rattlesnakes are diverse and widespread across the United States. Evidently each state offers a glimpse into the varied world of these fascinating reptiles. Generally respect them and they will respect you.

Finally before you leave, let me know what you thought of the states with the most rattlesnake species in the comments below.

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