Skip to Content

Chickens See Snow For the First Time After Rescued from Egg Farm

chickens see snow for the first time

Remember how rough the pandemic was? Imagine you had to do that all over again, but in a tiny cage with hundreds of people. Sadly this is the life many chickens lead. Luckily, these chickens were saved from a chicken farm and now get to see snow for the first time.

Let’s take a closer look at the current chicken conditions – together, we can work towards a world where every chicken experiences the joy of a first snowfall.

chickens see snow for the first time
©AnimalPlace – YouTube

The Harsh Reality of Battery Cages

Battery cages, unfortunately a standard in many egg farms, are small wire cages where hens spend their entire lives. These cages are so cramped that the birds cannot stretch their wings or engage in natural behaviors.

This confinement leads to physical and psychological stress. Chickens suffer feather loss, skin abrasions, and a host of other health issues. Also, the lack of movement also causes severe muscle and bone weaknesses.

Understanding “Cage-Free” and “Free-Range” Labels

While terms like “cage-free” and “free-range” suggest a better life for hens, the reality can be quite different.

Cage-free hens often live in overcrowded barns with limited access to the outdoors. Free-range labels can be misleading too, as the outdoor access might be minimal.

Consumers seeking ethically produced eggs need to understand these labels and support farms that provide genuinely better conditions for their hens.

Got Eggs? The Harsh Reality for Male Chickens

In the egg industry, male chicks are considered a byproduct. Since they cannot lay eggs and are not bred for meat, they are often killed shortly after hatching. This grim practice brutally illustrates the industry’s view of chickens as mere commodities, as opposed to animals deserving of a fulfilling life.

Raising awareness and advocating for alternative practices for male chickens is often overlooked, and should also be a focus of chicken activism.

Chickens See Snow for the First Time: The Video

YouTube video

In the video, we get to witness a group of hens, recently rescued from an egg farm, as they encounter snow for the first time. Their tentative steps and curious pecks at the unfamiliar white landscape symbolize more than just a new experience; they represent a newfound freedom.

These hens form part of a group of 3,000 saved from being gassed. At last, these birds are discovering a world beyond the cramped, restrictive cages of their past.

Farming Your Own Chickens: A Step Towards Compassion

For those with the means and space, farming your own chickens is a relatively easy way to ensure that you’re consuming cruelty-free eggs. Backyard hens can be provided with a safe, spacious environment, proper nutrition, and the care they need to live a happy life.

Not only will you have farm-fresh eggs for your breakfast, but you’ll also get entertaining and adorable pets!

What Ensures a Happy Chicken?

A happy chicken is one that can exhibit natural behaviors like foraging, dust bathing, and roosting. Adequate space, access to the outdoors, a varied diet, and proper veterinary care are essential.

Beyond these basic needs, chickens also need sufficient social interactions as they are highly social animals. In other words, they need besties just like we do to survive.

Ensuring these conditions not only improves the welfare of the chickens but can also lead to healthier, higher-quality eggs.

Chickens See Snow For the First Time: Conclusion

cowboy takes chicken for a ride.

This has just been a tiny glimpse into the all-too-often cruel industry of egg farming. Next time you go grocery shopping, maybe take an extra look when you buy your eggs to learn where they come from. Perhaps they’ll be a tad pricier, but knowing it comes from a happy and fulfilled chicken is surely worth it.

Thank you for reading this article about these rescued chickens that see snow for the first time! Chickens are fascinating birds, let’s get to know them even better:

Latest posts by Josie Messeter (see all)