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10 most venomous & non venomous spiders in the US

Red Widow (Latrodectus bishopi)
Red Widow (Latrodectus bishopi). Image by Wild Animal Species via YouTube

Spiders with their intiricate webs and eight legs are part of our everyday lives. Whether they are in hidden nooks in our houses or outside in your garden! In this article, we’ll educate ourselves on which spiders are deadly, and which ones are harmless.

1. Black Widow (Latrodectus spp.)

black widow bite
Black Widow spider outdoors on a web. Image via Depositphotos

2. Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa)

Brown Recluse Spider. Rosa Pineda, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Brown Recluse Spider. Rosa Pineda, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

3. Hobo Spider (Eratigena agrestis)

Hobo Spider. Adrian Tync, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

4. Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium spp.)

Yellow Sac
Yellow Sac Spider. Image via Deposit photos

5. Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus)

Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus)
Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus). Image by Wild Animal Species via YouTube

6. Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans)

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans)
Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans). Image by Wild Animal Species via YouTube

7. Red Widow (Latrodectus bishopi)

Red Widow (Latrodectus bishopi)
Red Widow (Latrodectus bishopi). Image by Wild Animal Species via YouTube

8. Six-eyed Sand Spider (Sicarius spp.)

Six-eyed Sand Spider
Six-eyed Sand Spider. Image by Daveslittlebeasties via YouTube

9. Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli)

Mouse Spider
Image by The Spider Man via YouTube

10. Desert Recluse (Loxosceles deserta)

Desert Recluse (Loxosceles deserta)
Desert Recluse (Loxosceles deserta). Image by Aureole Webweaver via YouTube

Now that we know the venomous spiders, lets move onto the non-venomous ones!

1. Jumping Spiders (Family Salticidae)

Jumping Spiders
Jumping Spider. Image via Deposit Photos

2. Orb Weaver Spiders (Family Araneidae)

golden orb spider
Golden Orb Weaver Spiders often exhibit sexual dimorphism, with females being significantly larger than males. Image by Abba Argaman via Unsplash

3. Wolf Spiders (Family Lycosidae)

Wolf Spider. flagstaffotos [at] gmail.com http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html, via Wikimedia Commons

4. Daddy Longlegs or Harvestmen (Order Opiliones)

Daddy Longlegs Spider
Daddy long legs spider on a white background. Image via Deposit Photos

5. Cellar Spiders (Family Pholcidae)

Long-legged Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides)
An image of the cellar spider (Pholcus phalangioides) carrying its eggs in her jaws too a safer spot after being disturbed from our outdoor shed. Image via Deposit Photos

6. House Spiders (Family Theridiidae)

Washington's Giant House Spiders
Detail of giant house spider eratigena artica on wood bokeh background. Image via Deposit Photos

7. Crab Spiders (Family Thomisidae)

Crab Spider
Crab Spider. Image via Deposit Photos

8. Grass Spiders (Family Agelenidae)

Agelenopsis
American grass spider – a genus of funnel weaver arachnid in the Agelenopsis sp genus. They construct a non sticky sheet of silk with a round opening. Isolated on white background top dorsal view. Image via Deposit Photos

9. Sheetweb Spiders (Family Linyphiidae)

Sheetweb Spiders (Family Linyphiidae)
Sheetweb Spiders (Family Linyphiidae). Image by Bee.Worldly via YouTube

10. Long-bodied Cellar Spider

Cellar Spider
Cellar Spider. Image via Deposit Photos

Overall, now that we know the difference between the venomous and non venomous spiders, we can all sleep more soundly at night!

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