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Watch: Elephant With Sweet Tooth Steals Sugarcane

elephant steals sugarcane
Fatty the elephant stealing sugarcane. Image by Newsflare
Newsflare on Youtube

In the peaceful region of Chachoengsao, Thailand, a 35-year-old wild elephant nicknamed “Fatty” has been causing trouble by stealing sugarcane. Unlike other elephants satisfied with jungle leaves, Fatty has developed a sweet tooth, which has led to some mischievous behavior that has caught the attention of locals.

Fatty The Elephant

asian elephant
Indian elephant bull. Image by Yathin S Krishnappav on Wikimedia Commons

Referred to affectionately as “Fatty” by the locals, this 35-year-old male elephant has turned into a familiar sight in the area. Unlike elephants with tusks, Fatty stands out for his adoration for food and playful antics. He is part of a gathering of wild elephants that, rather interestingly, head to the road each year to capture sugarcane trucks. According to Au Wanapin, a passerby, there are several elephants in the area with similar habits.

Fatty’s Sugarcane Heist

asian elephant
An Asian elephant in Sigiriya. Image by Lasanthi Wijayathunga on Wikimedia Commons

As seen in the footage shared by Newsflare, Fatty appeared from the thick forest and took to a road often used by passing trucks. With a clever strategy, the elephant placed himself in front of oncoming vehicles, forcing them to slow down. Taking advantage of the situation, Fatty effortlessly reached up to the trailers of the trucks, where the sweet-smelling shipment of freshly gathered sugarcane awaited.

Wildlife in Thailand

asian elephant herd
The spectacular image of the Asian elephant family that is drinking water from the river next to the Pinnawala village, Sri Lanka. The territory of the Pinnawala Elephant Orphanage. Image by goinyk on Depositphotos

Thailand is home to approximately 2,000 Asian elephants that walk freely in shielded forests. Unlike African elephants, male Asian elephants like Fatty tend to roam alone once they get to a certain age, while females remain with their herds. This natural habitat forms the backdrop for interesting exchanges between humans and wildlife.

A Culinary Adventure or Survival Tactic?

asian elephant steals sugarcane
Asian female elephant in tropical rainforest in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Image by Chalabala on Depositphotos

Wildlife officials think that clever elephants like Fatty have understood to ransack vehicles not out of hunger, but due to a tendency for the more delicious choices found in homes and trucks over the unrestricted jungle forage. This behavior underscores the resourcefulness and adaptability of these clever creatures.

Lawful Insurance for Elephants

asian elephant herd
Photo by V Srinivasan on Unsplash

Elephants hold a special place in Thailand, and the nation has strict laws safeguarding these majestic animals. The killing of elephants carries severe penalties, including a maximum prison term of ten years and a substantial fine of 1,000,000 baht. This legal framework underscores the obligation to preserve the diverse untamed life that contributes to the country’s natural beauty.

Balancing Human and Elephant Claims

asian elephants
Photo by Kym Ellis on Unsplash

Fatty’s playful escapades carry a bit of whimsy to the lives of Chachoengsao residents. In any case, it also raises important questions about coexistence among humans and natural life. As communities track down ways to safeguard the two elephants and local interests, Fatty’s sugarcane heist serves as a sign of the delicate balance required for a harmonious relationship between humans and the animal kingdom.

Conclusion

Fatty, the sugarcane-cherishing elephant, adds a magnificent chapter to the shared story of humans and natural life in Thailand. As communities adapt and track down ways to coexist, each experience with Fatty becomes a cherished second, celebrating the beauty of nature and the uniqueness of the animal kingdom.

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