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Watch This Fight: Hyena Learns to Never Underestimate a Donkey

hyena and donkey fight
Photo by Human Being via YouTube
YouTube video

In the video, the hyena attempts an attack on a donkey. To everybody’s surprise, the donkey, usually perceived as a submissive animal, defends itself aggressively, biting down hard on the hyena’s face and ears.

Stubbornly, the donkey refuses to let go and by the end of the video we can be sure that the hyena has learnt to never underestimate a donkey.

Are Donkeys Aggressive?

donkey
Photo by [email protected] via Depositphotos

Contrary to popular belief, donkeys are not always the placid creatures they are often portrayed to be. While they are generally calm and friendly, donkeys can be quite formidable when threatened.

They are known to be fiercely protective of their territory and fellow herd members. In situations where they feel cornered or endangered, donkeys can exhibit aggressive behavior, including kicking and biting, to defend themselves.

Hunting Techniques of Hyenas

hyena
Photo by Henrik Hansen via Unsplash

Hyenas, particularly the spotted hyenas featured in the video, are skilled hunters and not just scavengers, as commonly believed. They employ complex hunting strategies and possess powerful jaws that allow them to crush bones and consume almost every part of their catch.

Despite their predatory prowess – even the most adept predators can miscalculate and find themselves in peril.

How Donkeys Fight Back

donkey
Photo by Ansgar Scheffold via Unsplash

In the face of danger, donkeys exhibit a fight response that is both powerful and determined. They use their teeth and hooves as weapons, capable of inflicting serious harm. Their bite can be particularly punishing and they aim for sensitive areas such as the face or limbs – as seen in the video.

The Resilience of Donkeys

donkey
Image by Ilo via Pixabay

Donkeys have a remarkable ability to endure and adapt to various environments, which has made them invaluable to humans for centuries. They are known for their strength, intelligence, and independent nature. Their endurance and hardiness are often underestimated, a fact that the hyena in the video learned the hard way.

A Hyena’s Weaknesses

spotted hyena
Photo by Deborah Varrie via Unsplash

Despite their reputation as effective predators, hyenas have their vulnerabilities. They are less equipped to handle direct and aggressive confrontations, especially when isolated. Hyenas rely more on their ability to outmaneuver and outlast their prey rather than on brute force.

When facing a head-on attack, they can quickly become disoriented and overwhelmed.

Why Would a Hyena Be Alone?

hyenas
Photo by Catherine Merlin via Unsplash

Though known for living in cooperative societies, individual hyenas occasionally hunt solo due to the high cost of feeding competition within their group. This solitary hunting is a strategic choice to avoid hierarchy-based conflicts over food, a throwback to their ancestral scavenging days.

Social Structures of Hyenas

pack of hyenas
Photo by OndrejProsicky via Depositphotos

Spotted hyenas live in large, tightly-knit clans dominated by females. These clans are organized and led by an alpha female and exhibit a distinct social order, where each member has a specific rank.

This hierarchy is maintained through various social behaviors like grooming, vocalizations, and displays of dominance or submission.

Hyena and Donkey in Intense Fight: Conclusion

pack of donkeys
Image by Mario Hagen via Pixabay

The video of the donkey’s unexpected triumph over a hyena provides a fascinating glimpse into the complexities of animal behavior. It reminds us that nature often defies our expectations, revealing traits and capabilities that go beyond conventional wisdom. This incident not only serves as a thrilling spectacle but also as an educational insight into the survival instincts and behaviors of these two species.

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